Welcome to our information and guidance section

Whether you’re interested in starting to wear contact lenses, or want to know more about the latest research and developments in contact lens products, the BCLA website provides up-to-date independent guidance.

In this section, you will find everything you need to know about contact lens wear and care, including types of lenses, how to avoid infections, do’s and don't’s of contact lens wear, and contact lenses and sport.

Your contact lens practitioner can provide you with more information on what contact lenses can do for you, and the best lens type to suit your individual needs. Use our 'Find a contact lens practitioner' tool to locate your nearest BCLA member practitioner.

Please note: The BCLA can only provide general information that is not intended to be a substitute for a proper professional care and advice. If you have a specific question about your eyes or contact lenses, we recommend that you consult an eye care professional. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information on this site, the BCLA will not accept liability for any loss or damage or inconvenience arising as a consequence of any information on this website.

Top FAQs about contact lenses

How do I go about getting contact lenses?If you want to wear contact lenses to correct your eyesight, you must start by consulting an eyecare practitioner for a fitting. Only registered optometrists, contact lens opticians and medical practitioners can fi...

Important dos and don'ts of contact lens wear

Here are some useful tips on contact lens wear and care to help you get the best out of your contact lenses. Do Have regular check-ups as advised by your practitioner Always wash and dry your hands prior to handling your lenses Always rub, rinse and...

Acanthamoeba and contact lenses

Importance guidance to minimise the risk of infection Never allow water to come into contact with your contact lenses or contact lens storage case.Never rinse your lenses in tap water as it contains many impurities that can contaminate or damage your len...

Aftercare for contact lens wearers

Looking after your contact lenses Follow your eyecare practitioner's advice carefully and completely to ensure that you always get the best from your contact lenses. Advances in contact lenses and solutions are constantly being made, bringing new benefit...

Astigmatism and contact lenses

Astigmatism is a focusing disorder of the eye that distorts vision. The higher the level of astigmatism, the poorer the person's quality of vision will be if it is not corrected. Astigmatism is very common eye condition. A study of more than 11,000 spect...

Benefits of contact lenses

Although contact lenses have been around for more than a century, the past decade has seen tremendous developments in lens materials and design to bring even greater benefits to contact lens wearers. Today, almost all eyesight conditions can be corrected...

Benefits of contact lenses over glasses for sports

Contact lenses have many advantages over glasses for sport, not just from the practical point of view but for visual reasons too. Some of the benefits of contact lenses are given below (adapted from Performance, Vision and Sport, courtesy of Dr Martin Ca...

Bifocal and multifocal contact lenses

Eyesight changes throughout life and the focusing power of the eye also changes over time. As we get older, the ability of the lens inside our eye to change shape – allowing us to focus on objects over the whole range from far distance to close up – gradu...

Contact lens solutions

Following the correct hygiene procedures is crucial to maximising successful and safe lens wear. Most contact lenses need to be cleaned and disinfected with solutions in order to provide optimal performance and, in the case of soft lenses, to keep them hy...

Contact lenses for keratoconus

Keratoconus is an eye condition in which the cornea (the transparent front part of the eye) becomes cone-shaped rather than round. The estimated prevalence for keratoconus in the general population is 54 per 100,0001. It usually occurs in both eyes, altho...

Contact lenses and lifestyle

Everyone has unique visual requirements according to their lifestyle, occupational and leisure needs. To reflect this, there are different types of contact lenses with a variety of lens replacement and wearing schedules, each offering their own advantages...

Contact lenses and myopia control in children

Myopia (short sight) is an important cause of reduced vision throughout the world and its incidence is increasing. About one in three of the US population is myopic (short sighted). In some Asian countries up to 80 per cent of children are affected. Myop...

Contact lenses and sport

According to Sport England, some 15.5 million people now play sport at least once a week. Whatever your chosen sport or level, wearing the best form of vision correction can help you achieve the best possible performance and enjoyment. Elite athletes oft...

Contact lenses for children and teens

More than 3.7m people in the UK enjoy the many benefits of contact lenses but only a very small proportion of them are children. Nearly one in five children aged five to 15 years, rising to almost one in three 16-19 year olds need vision correction yet o...

Contact lenses versus refractive surgery

Contact lenses are the first choice for many people who wish to correct their visual needs. For many, they provide flexibility and convenience and they are a safe way to correct shortcomings in vision. However, they must be used correctly and your eyes sh...

Cosmetic contact lenses

Under UK legislation that took effect in 2005, zero-powered or 'plano cosmetic' contact lenses (non-corrective contact lenses designed to change the colour or appearance of the eye) are regulated in a different way from powered lenses. Zero-powered lense...

Daily disposable soft contact lenses

Daily disposable soft contact lenses, worn for a day then thrown away, are a very simple and convenient way of correcting your vision. They also offer high levels of comfort and ocular health. First introduced in 1995, daily disposables now come in a ran...

Dos and don'ts of contact lens solutions

Follow these simple tips to help you get the best out of your contact lens solution: Do • Rub, rinse and store your lenses in the recommended solution before and after each use (except single-use lenses, which should be discarded after each wear) • Disca...

Finding a contact lens practitioner

When fitting you with contact lenses, your contact lens practitioner has hundreds of products to choose from and, for a given product, there may be thousands of possible specifications. It is reassuring if you are confident your practitioner will select t...

Infection and contact lenses

Problems with contact lenses are thankfully rare but are more likely to occur if the recommended hygiene procedures are not followed. That's why it's important to listen carefully to the advice of your contact lens practitioner and always follow instructi...